Joyce “Tondré Grapefield” Syrah
Joyce “Tondré Grapefield” Syrah

Joyce “Tondré Grapefield” Syrah

California, United States 2019 (750mL)
Regular price$41.00
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Joyce “Tondré Grapefield” Syrah

Situated on the eastern slopes of the Santa Lucia Mountain Range, south of Salinas, the vineyards of the Santa Lucia Highlands AVA are some of the coolest-climate sites in the state, situated directly in the path of powerful winds that bring daily refreshment from the Monterey Bay—home to one of the world’s largest submarine canyons and, thus, some of its coldest water. The length of the Santa Lucia Highlands growing season is exceptional—and not threatened by autumn rains—making it possible to preserve acidity and develop proper physiological maturity in grapes. Here’s a California Syrah that a vintner in the Northern Rhône would be proud to call his own!


The “Tondré Grapefield” vineyard, which has four acres of Syrah, is farmed by Joe Alarid, a veteran grower in the Salinas Valley. Joyce has sourced Syrah from this cool, marine-influenced site since 2013. The strong influence of Pacific Ocean currents, combined with the gravelly loam soil of the vineyard site, makes for a Syrah of supreme tension and bright fruit.


Hand-harvested fruit from Tondré Grapefield was fermented with 60% of the whole grape clusters intact, lending lots of spice and snap. Fermentation on ambient yeasts occurred in a small, open-topped vessel, followed by 10 months of aging in a 50-50 mix of concrete tanks and used oak barrels. The wine was transferred back into tank for a month of settling before it was bottled unfined and unfiltered. Just 460 cases were produced.

Joyce “Tondré Grapefield” Syrah
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United States

Washington

Columbia Valley

Like many Washington wines, the “Columbia Valley” indication only tells part of the story: Columbia Valley covers a huge swath of Central
Washington, within which are a wide array of smaller AVAs (appellations).

Oregon

Willamette Valley

Oregon’s Willamette Valley has become an elite winegrowing zone in record time. Pioneering vintner David Lett, of The Eyrie Vineyard, planted the first Pinot Noir in the region in 1965, soon to be followed by a cadre of forward-thinking growers who (correctly) saw their wines as America’s answer to French
Burgundies. Today, the Willamette
Valley is indeed compared favorably to Burgundy, Pinot Noir’s spiritual home. And while Pinot Noir accounts for 64% of Oregon’s vineyard plantings, there are cool-climate whites that must not be missed.

California

Santa Barbara

Among the unique features of Santa Barbara County appellations like Ballard Canyon (a sub-zone of the Santa Ynez Valley AVA), is that it has a cool, Pacific-influenced climate juxtaposed with the intense luminosity of a southerly
latitude (the 34th parallel). Ballard Canyon has a more north-south orientation compared to most Santa Barbara AVAs, with soils of sandy
clay/loam and limestone.

California

Paso Robles

Situated at an elevation of 1,600 feet, it is rooted in soils of sandy loam and falls within the Highlands District of the Paso Robles AVA.

New York

North Fork

Wine growers and producers on Long Island’s North Fork have traditionally compared their terroir to that of Bordeaux and have focused on French varieties such as Cabernet Franc and Merlot.

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